0

Basement Sewage Pump

Basement Sewage Pump

Home How does a sewage pump work? How does a sewage pump work? In above grade homes, sewage systems operate based on gravity, wherein sewage flows downhill and enters a municipal sewer line or a septic tank. However, sewage that originates in a basement of a home is typically situated below septic or sewage lines and gravity can’t be applied to move the waste. In such instances, a sewage pump needs to be installed. The function of a sewage pump is to move sewage liquids and solids between one location and another. Typically, in residential applications, sewage (including soft solids up to 2” in diameter) is pumped from a sewage basin to a sewer system or a septic tank. A sewage pump is installed at the lowest point of the sewage basin. The basin itself is placed at or below the floor level of the basement. Since the pump is submerged most of the time, it is also referred to as a submersible sewage pump. Sewage pump can be automatic, manual or dual (piggyback) mode. Manual pumps need be manually turned on/off as the need arises. Automatic pumps have a floating switch, which turns the pump on and off whenever sewage in the basin reaches a certain (usually pre-set) level. A dual mode pump contains a piggyback plug, which allows the pump to be used as either manual, wherein the pump bypasses the switch and is plugged in directly into the socket or as automatic, wherein the pump is plugged in through the floating switch and works only when the switch is activated. Due to a possibility of sewage overflow, it is generally not advised to use a manual sewage pump inside of a sewage basin. Sewage pumps are centrifugal pumps, with special design considerations enabling solids to pass without clogging the pump. When the pump is turned on, the motor starts to rotate the impeller, creating the pressure that pushes water into the impeller and from there into the discharge pipe. The sewage pump is powered through a 10-25 ft electric cord. Depending on the model, the voltage can be 115, 230, 460, or 575 volts. The pump housing, which contains a motor and an impeller, is made with cast iron and is built for long term use. Little Giant and Liberty sewage pumps come with legs attached to the housing, which keep the pump a few inches above bottom of the barrel. Little Giant sewage pumps and Liberty sewage pumps are amongst the most popular product lines on the market today. Each company carries a wide variety of pumps with different specifications which are based on size of solids, pressure drop, elevation as well as diameter and length of pipes. While the most common use of a sewage pump is to pump residential waste, some models can also be used in industrial, commercial and agricultural applications.
basement sewage pump 1

Basement Sewage Pump

How does a sewage pump work? In above grade homes, sewage systems operate based on gravity, wherein sewage flows downhill and enters a municipal sewer line or a septic tank. However, sewage that originates in a basement of a home is typically situated below septic or sewage lines and gravity can’t be applied to move the waste. In such instances, a sewage pump needs to be installed. The function of a sewage pump is to move sewage liquids and solids between one location and another. Typically, in residential applications, sewage (including soft solids up to 2” in diameter) is pumped from a sewage basin to a sewer system or a septic tank. A sewage pump is installed at the lowest point of the sewage basin. The basin itself is placed at or below the floor level of the basement. Since the pump is submerged most of the time, it is also referred to as a submersible sewage pump. Sewage pump can be automatic, manual or dual (piggyback) mode. Manual pumps need be manually turned on/off as the need arises. Automatic pumps have a floating switch, which turns the pump on and off whenever sewage in the basin reaches a certain (usually pre-set) level. A dual mode pump contains a piggyback plug, which allows the pump to be used as either manual, wherein the pump bypasses the switch and is plugged in directly into the socket or as automatic, wherein the pump is plugged in through the floating switch and works only when the switch is activated. Due to a possibility of sewage overflow, it is generally not advised to use a manual sewage pump inside of a sewage basin. Sewage pumps are centrifugal pumps, with special design considerations enabling solids to pass without clogging the pump. When the pump is turned on, the motor starts to rotate the impeller, creating the pressure that pushes water into the impeller and from there into the discharge pipe. The sewage pump is powered through a 10-25 ft electric cord. Depending on the model, the voltage can be 115, 230, 460, or 575 volts. The pump housing, which contains a motor and an impeller, is made with cast iron and is built for long term use. Little Giant and Liberty sewage pumps come with legs attached to the housing, which keep the pump a few inches above bottom of the barrel. Little Giant sewage pumps and Liberty sewage pumps are amongst the most popular product lines on the market today. Each company carries a wide variety of pumps with different specifications which are based on size of solids, pressure drop, elevation as well as diameter and length of pipes. While the most common use of a sewage pump is to pump residential waste, some models can also be used in industrial, commercial and agricultural applications.
basement sewage pump 2

Basement Sewage Pump

BobJackson April 1, 2013 at 6:06 pm # “Sewage runs downhill” as the old saying goes (Rated G version). It doesn’t matter if the main sewer line is tied to a municipal sewage system or septic tank, if the main sewer line is higher than the basement bathroom soil pipes then a sewage basin and pump are necessary. > If I had my house built with a roughed in bathroom, do I still required a sewage basin and pump? It depends on the elevation of your basement with respect to the main sewer line. For example, my neighbor’s house is on a hill with the basement floor elevation well above street level. The main sewer line runs below the basement floor to the sewer beneath the street. His basement bathroom does not need a sewage basin and pump because gravity does the job just like the bathrooms and kitchen on the main floor. If you’re building a house, your architect or builder will know if you need a sewage basin and pump. Reply
basement sewage pump 3

Basement Sewage Pump

“Sewage runs downhill” as the old saying goes (Rated G version). It doesn’t matter if the main sewer line is tied to a municipal sewage system or septic tank, if the main sewer line is higher than the basement bathroom soil pipes then a sewage basin and pump are necessary. > If I had my house built with a roughed in bathroom, do I still required a sewage basin and pump? It depends on the elevation of your basement with respect to the main sewer line. For example, my neighbor’s house is on a hill with the basement floor elevation well above street level. The main sewer line runs below the basement floor to the sewer beneath the street. His basement bathroom does not need a sewage basin and pump because gravity does the job just like the bathrooms and kitchen on the main floor. If you’re building a house, your architect or builder will know if you need a sewage basin and pump. Reply
basement sewage pump 4

Basement Sewage Pump

It’s because the Drain-Waste-Vent (DWV) system isn’t working properly or maybe not connected. DWV is fancy name for the air vent pipes to the roof and/or Air Admittance Valves (AAV) that equalizes the air pressure during water movement in the pipes such that water displacement doesn’t suck the shower, toilet and sink traps dry. When the pump drains the sewage basin the volume of displaced water must be backfilled by air. (Likewise when the basin fills with water, the air in the basin must escape to the outdoors through the roof vent pipe.) When your sewage pump operates it draws a vacuum pulling air in through the shower and toilet traps because the DWV isn’t able to supply the needed intake air. That’s the sucking/gurgling noises. Venting for Plumbing Systems is an in-depth review of DWV plumbing. The DWV installation for my basement bathroom is shown in these articles: * How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Part 10 illustrates the DWV PVC vent pipe from the basin to the roof vent. * How to Finish a Basement Bathroom – Part 13 shows the Studor Mini-Vent Air Admittance Valve installation under the basement sink. The Building Code always requires the roof vent pipe DWV and depending on jurisdiction, may require the AAV (Studor Mini-Vent) at sink fixtures. The AAV reduces home construction costs by minimizing the quantity of outdoor vent pipes to the various plumbing fixtures. This related project has more about the Studor Mini-Vent. I think your DWV issue with the sewage basin pump should be easy to correct given the severity of the problem. Ensure the sewage basin air vent pipe is connected, isn’t underwater in the basin (it only needs to extend just below the basin cover) and open to the outdoors. You’ll need to follow it up to the roof to be sure. Install a Studor Mini-Vent under the basement sink if you don’t have one. Home Depot has the Studor Mini-Vent. Thanks, Bob Reply

Basement Sewage Pump

Basement Sewage Pump
Basement Sewage Pump

You can download all 4 of Basement Sewage Pump photo to your computer by right clicking picture and then save image as. Do not forget to share if you interest with this photo.